Random Ryan

Consider me your crossing guard at the intersection of Ridiculous Road and Awesome Ave.

  1. This is every time I try and talk to anyone. (via xkcd: Preferred Chat System)

    This is every time I try and talk to anyone. (via xkcd: Preferred Chat System)

  2. pummelwhack:

    THEY REALLY ARE A TAUTOLOGY OMFG.

    if you’re not familiar with deductive logic, here’s a crash course:

    statements have two truth values: true or false. by connecting statements with logical operators, you can determine the truth value of a compound statement like kate’s rather complex train of thought up there. every operator has a mathematical function and you solve it like an equation. when all truth values beneath the main operator are true, the compound statement is considered a tautology. kate did all of that in her head.

    if you don’t love kate bishop, i really don’t know what you’re doing with your life.

    I heart Kate Bishop.

  3. beaumarbre:

inabasket:

Wow, the new Monsters Inc movie looks brutal. 

i laughed for 10 years at the caption

Joss Whedon does work for Disney in a very broad capacity at the moment. Oh shit, is the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe his take on The Incredibles?!

    beaumarbre:

    inabasket:

    Wow, the new Monsters Inc movie looks brutal. 

    i laughed for 10 years at the caption

    Joss Whedon does work for Disney in a very broad capacity at the moment. Oh shit, is the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe his take on The Incredibles?!

    (Source: spacecadet)

  4. awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Kiss and Tupac

Hello new background image.

    awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

    Kiss and Tupac

    Hello new background image.

  5. This couch.

    This couch.

  6. thingsthatexciteme:

Lake Bell

Uuuuhhfff.

    thingsthatexciteme:

    Lake Bell

    Uuuuhhfff.

  7. theimpossiblecool:

“The secret of success is making your vocation your vacation.” 
Mark Twain.

    theimpossiblecool:

    “The secret of success is making your vocation your vacation.” 

    Mark Twain.

  8. Film This: Film This 101: Dutch Angles »

    officialfilmthis:

    Today we’re going to learn about a very simple filmmaking technique that with a quick tilt of a camera can generate deep feelings of uneasiness and raise the anxiety of your audience. Yes, we’re talking about Dutch Angles.

    According to Wikipedia, The Dutch angle, also known as Dutch tilt,…

  9. cinephilearchive:

John HustonAugust 5, 1906 — August 28, 1987
I must say that this is one of the best interviews with John Huston.

Let’s see if we can follow your filmmaking method through logically and go on to a description of the process of turning the script into film.
Actually I don’t separate the elements of filmmaking in such an abstract manner. For example, the directing of a film, to me, is simply an extension of the process of writing. It’s the process of rendering the thing you have written. You’re still writing when you’re directing. Of course you’re not composing words, but a gesture, the way you make somebody raise his eyes or shake his head is also writing for films. Nor can I answer precisely what the relative importance, to me, of the various aspects of filmmaking is, I mean, whether I pay more attention to writing, directing, editing, or what—have—you. The most important element to me is always the idea that I’m trying to express, and everything technical is only a method to make the idea into clear form. I’m always working on the idea: whether I am writing, directing, choosing music or cutting. Everything must revert back to the idea; when it gets away from the idea it becomes a labyrinth of rococo.
Occasionally one tends to forget the idea, but I have always had reason to regret this whenever it happened. Sometimes you fall in love with a shot, for example. Maybe it is a tour de force as a shot. This is one of the great dangers of directing: to let the camera take over. Audiences very often do not understand this danger, and it is not unusual that camerawork is appreciated in cases where it really has no business in the film, simply because it is decorative or in itself exhibitionistic. I would say that there are maybe half a dozen directors who really know their camera—how to move their camera. It’s a pity that critics often do not appreciate this. On the other hand I think it’s OK that audiences should not be aware of this. In fact, when the camera is in motion, in the best-directed scenes, the audiences should not be aware of what the camera is doing. They should be following the action and the road of the idea so closely, that they shouldn’t be aware of what’s going on technically. —How I Make Films: Interview with John Huston, Film Quarterly, Fall 1965



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Follow @LaFamiliaFilm

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    cinephilearchive:

    John Huston
    August 5, 1906 — August 28, 1987

    I must say that this is one of the best interviews with John Huston.


    Let’s see if we can follow your filmmaking method through logically and go on to a description of the process of turning the script into film.

    Actually I don’t separate the elements of filmmaking in such an abstract manner. For example, the directing of a film, to me, is simply an extension of the process of writing. It’s the process of rendering the thing you have written. You’re still writing when you’re directing. Of course you’re
    not composing words, but a gesture, the way you make somebody raise his eyes or shake his head is also writing for films. Nor can I answer precisely what the relative importance, to me, of the various aspects of filmmaking is, I mean, whether I pay more attention to writing, directing, editing, or what—have—you. The most important element to me is always the idea that I’m trying to express, and everything technical is only a method to make the idea into clear form. I’m always working on the idea: whether I am writing, directing, choosing music or cutting. Everything must revert back
    to the idea; when it gets away from the idea it becomes a labyrinth of rococo.

    Occasionally one tends to forget the idea, but I have always had reason to regret this whenever it happened. Sometimes you fall in love with a shot, for example. Maybe it is a tour de force as a shot. This is one of the great dangers of directing: to let the camera take over. Audiences very often do not understand this danger, and it is not unusual that camerawork is appreciated in cases where it really has no business in the film, simply because it is decorative or in itself exhibitionistic. I would say that there are maybe half a dozen directors who really know their camera—how to move their camera. It’s a pity that critics often do not appreciate this. On the other hand I think it’s OK that audiences should not be aware of this. In fact, when the camera is in motion, in the best-directed scenes, the audiences should not be aware of what the camera is doing. They should be following
    the action and the road of the idea so closely, that they shouldn’t be aware of what’s going on technically. —How I Make Films: Interview with John Huston, Film Quarterly, Fall 1965

  10. vintagegal:

    Jane Fonda on the set of Barbarella (1968)

  11. This might be the coolest photo ever taken.

    This might be the coolest photo ever taken.

  12. peircelouise:

Awwww bb

    peircelouise:

    Awwww bb

    (Source: cineraria)

  13. theimpossiblecool:

“Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!”
Hunter S. Thompson

    theimpossiblecool:

    “Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming “Wow! What a Ride!”

    Hunter S. Thompson

  14. azurecrucis:

We found love in a hopeless place

    azurecrucis:

    We found love in a hopeless place

  15. visualmash-hups:

http://society6.com/quibe/Coupling-Up-accoupls-Like-Skywalker_T-shirt#11=49&4=25

How did it take the internet this long to think this up.

    visualmash-hups:

    http://society6.com/quibe/Coupling-Up-accoupls-Like-Skywalker_T-shirt#11=49&4=25

    How did it take the internet this long to think this up.

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